Roundtrip Portland - 9 Days

Roundtrip Portland Cruise Summary

Relive the daring exploits of frontiersmen in the Pacific Norwest as you discover some of America’s most stunning destinations, on a cruise along the Snake and Columbia rivers, beginning with a hotel stay in Portland and a day to explore the Canadian city of Vancouver.

Surrounded by forests and a stone’s throw away from the Pacific, Astoria is a picturesque port city with Victorian-era homes etched into hills overlooking the Columbia River.

Disembarking in Camas and Washougal, join us for a scenic drive through the National Scenic Area of the Columbia River Gorge. Then explore the end of the Oregon Trail – the Dalles – where gold miners, soldiers, pioneers and adventurers once ventured.

Cruising onwards to Sevenson, browse through the locally owned antique stores and art galleries, or visit the Columbia River Gorge Interpretive Centre and the Bonneville Dam, on our included Hop-On Hop-Off Tour.

 

 

Highlights

  • Pre-cruise hotel stay in Portland, with a full day in the relaxed Canadian city of Vancouver
  • Scenic drive through the Columbia River Gorge, to the backdrop of three dormant volcanoes
  • Chance to enjoy a premium post-cruise tour to the Johnston Ridge Observatory on Mount St. Helens, for spectacular views of the volcanic crater

 

 

2024 All-inclusive fares from £4,899 pp

roundtrip portland

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day-by-day itinerary

 

Day 1: Hotel Stay – Vancouver (Portland) Washington

Enjoy your stay at the pre-cruise hotel. The evening is yours to become acquainted with the city. For your convenience, our Hospitality Desk will be located in the hotel, and our friendly staff can assist with everything from general questions about your upcoming voyage to reserving premium experiences. Representatives from American Queen Voyages and our local port/city partner will be available to provide you with dining, entertainment and sightseeing options to maximise your time here.

 

 

Day 2: Vancouver (Portland) Washington

This port, nestled between the Pacific Ocean, the Columbia River Gorge and Mount St. Helens, is a suburb of Portland, Oregon. Vancouver’s history begins with the Lewis & Clark expedition in 1806, when Meriwether Lewis had the wisdom to characterise the area as “the only desired situation for settlement west of the Rocky Mountains.” In 1825, voyageurs from the Hudson’s Bay Company broke a bottle of rum on a flagstaff and hoisted the Union Jack in the breeze. Fortunately for history buffs, attractions and museums will enlighten you, and in some cases, let you relive some exciting times from the fur trade to the settlement of Fort Vancouver. Vancouver is as naturally beautiful as it is diverse.

 

Day 3: Astoria, Oregon

Surrounded by forests, boasting three rivers and situated a stone’s throw away from the Pacific, Astoria is a picturesque port city with Victorian-era homes etched into hills overlooking the Columbia River. Astoria is known to be the oldest American settlement west of the Rocky Mountains, inhabited for thousands of years by the Clatsop Tribe.  Astoria has a rich history that reflects the many influences the town has had from people and cultures around the world. Many of its current residents are descendants from early settlers, many of whom were Chinese and played a significant role in Astoria’s history especially in the canneries, railroads, and the jetties at the Columbia River. The Garden of Surging Waves is a beautiful park that celebrates and honours Astoria’s relationship with China over the years. The Astoria Riverwalk is the lifeblood of the city and the best way to get a feel for the city spirit.

Included Shore Excursions

ASTORIA HOP-ON HOP-OFF TOUR

The Riverwalk – A six-mile paved walkway overlooking the beautiful Columbia River. In addition to the remarkable views, guests can explore the statues, shops, cafes, docks, and historic canneries dotting the path. Guests, who wish to, can choose to board the riverfront trolley that runs along the banks for an extra fee. The Astoria Riverwalk, also known as the Astoria River Trail, stretches the entire length of the city’s waterfront, connecting restaurants and breweries, museums, and dozens of other attractions. It passes under the Astoria-Megler Bridge, the largest continuous truss bridge in the United States, arcing out across the Columbia River toward the hazy hillsides of Washington state. The trail follows the route of the Astoria and Columbia River Railroad that was completed in 1898.

The Flavel House – As one of the best-preserved examples of Queen Anne architecture in the Northwest, the Flavel House survives today as a landmark of local and national significance. The house was built as a retirement home in 1885 for Columbia River bar pilot, Captain George Flavel, and his family. The Flavel House has been restored and furnished to portray the elegance of the Victorian period and the history of the Flavel family. Its decorative exterior, with hipped roof, balconies, and verandas, is distinguished by a fourth-story cupola. The interior of the home features original Eastlake influenced woodwork, period furnishings, six exotic hardwood fireplace mantels, and fourteen-foot ceilings with plaster crown molding and medallions.

Astoria Column – This magnificent monument stands 600 feet above sea level and gives the perfect view to Young’s Bay, the Coast Range, the Columbia River, and in the distance, even the Pacific Ocean. Ralph Budd initiated the project to celebrate Astoria’s early settlers. He hired Italian immigrant and artist Atillilio Pusterla to model a piece inspired by Trajan’s Column in Rome, featuring hand-painted spiral frieze work, stretching over 500 feet if it were to be unwound. The Astor family, with the help of the Great Northern Railroad, generously donated the column to Astoria in July of 1926.

Heritage Museum – Astoria’s Old City Hall building, a neoclassical structure designed by prominent Portland architect Emil Schacht in 1904, is home to the Historical Society’s collection and archive. Clatsop County’s rich and exciting history is featured in the museum’s permanent and changing exhibit galleries. Objects on display include a 1,000-year-old hunting implement, finely crafted 19th-century Chinook and Clatsop Indian baskets, and a sea otter pelt and beaver hat which illuminate the early history of Astoria. Logging and fishing, the two economic mainstays since 1870, are represented in collections of tools, equipment, and photographs. The stories of the many diverse ethnic groups that settled in the area are depicted in the Emigrants Gallery. A recent addition to the Heritage Museum’s exhibits and located on the second floor, is “Vice and Virtue in Clatsop County: 1890 to Prohibition.” The gallery contains a partially reconstructed saloon and illustrates Astoria’s seedy past when the town was known along the West Coast for its infamous saloons and brothels.

Columbia River Maritime Museum – Here, guests can experience interactive displays, galleries and collections representing the history of the mighty Columbia River throughout time. The museum was founded in 1962 when Rolf Klep returned to his birthplace after retiring from his art career on the East Coast. Klep was a long-time collector of maritime artifacts and he began to recruit his colleagues and friends to help establish a museum to present these collections. The museum was the first in Oregon to meet national accreditation standards and is designated the official maritime museum of Oregon. After a $6 million expansion, the museum now holds six galleries, the Great Hall, and the Lightship Columbia. Enjoy over 30,000 artifacts and 20,000 photos as you travel through this expansive maritime museum! Trail Interactive exhibit! (Admission Additional)

Premium Shore Excursions
THE LEWIS & CLARK EXPERIENCE
 
Trace the journeys of Lewis and Clark as we begin the day traveling to Middle Village – Station Camp, the location that Lewis and Clark and the Corps of Discovery camped for ten days in November of 1805. Then watch as the powerful waves of the Pacific crash into the bluffs below and take in breathtaking views of the Columbia River at Cape Disappointment, the location Lewis and Clark concluded their two year exploration. Next we’ll stop at the Lewis and Clark National Historical Park, Fort Clatsop, where you can become an explorer as well – discover extensive exhibits and replicas outlining the journeys of this famous duo.
 
 

Day 4: Portland, Washington

American Queen Voyages guests will find abundant recreational activities, quirky shops, excellent restaurants, a burgeoning craft brew scene, and charming locals proud to show off this Pacific Northwest gem. The 90-foot Grant Street Pier is the focal point of the new Vancouver Waterfront. The cable-stayed pier is a gathering place for visitors and locals alike. Enjoy a fresh seafood dish on the Wild Fin Patio while watching sailboats pass by or grab something to go at the What-A-Catch Fish Bar walk-up window. If you seek an adult-beverage pour a local brew from the area’s only self-serve beer wall on the second floor of Barlows Public House or sip a Washington wine at Maryhill Winery’s satellite tasting room. You can even do a whole wine walk to five tasting rooms within a few blocks.

 

Day 5: Camas/Washougal, Washington 

Camas and Washougal are located side-by-side on the banks of the Columbia River. Part of the Portland-Vancouver metropolitan area, this community serves as the “Gateway to the Gorge.” A highlight to a visit here is a drive through the Columbia River Gorge, the largest national scenic area in the United States. Up to 4,000 feet deep, the Gorge stretches for more than 80 miles as the Columbia River winds westward through the Cascade Range, forming the boundary between the State of Washington to the north and Oregon to the south. Three volcanoes dominate the Cascades and are major attractions when visiting the Gorge. Majestic Mt. Hood is the highest point in Oregon. It is one of the three dormant volcanoes in this region, with Mt. Adams and Mt. St. Helens located across the river in Washington state. The western Gorge, with an average annual rainfall of 75 inches, is lush and green with misty mountains, old growth forest and over 40 plus waterfalls. The eastern Gorge, with an annual rainfall of less than 15 inches, is a region of rocky bluffs, rolling hills, desert wildflowers and wide, open spaces. 

 

Day 6: The Dalles, Oregon

Known as the end of the Oregon Trail, The Dalles holds a unique place in history as the gateway to the Inland Empire. The Dalles was the jumping-off spot for pioneers, soldiers, gold miners, adventurers, gunslingers, floozies and scallywags, who loaded their wagons onto rafts or barges and floated down the Columbia to the mouth of the Willamette River, then upriver to Oregon City. The Barlow Trail was constructed later to permit an overland crossing. The Dalles was also the site of Fort Dalles. Established in 1850 to protect immigrants after the Whitman Massacre, it was the only military post between the Pacific Coast and Wyoming.

Included Shore Excursions

THE DALLES HOP-ON HOP-OFF TOUR
Columbia Gorge Discovery Center & Museum Enjoy the beautiful paved walking trails, a pond, and scenic overlooks. The Discovery Center is located in a beautiful and unique ecosystem native to the area. The multimedia, interactive museum inspires appreciation and stewardship of the natural and cultural treasures of the gorge and Wasco County. Exhibits focus on the volcanic upheaval and raging floods that shaped the gorge, the unique flora and fauna of the region, and 11,000 years of cultural history. In addition to touring the many fascinating exhibits, visitors can spend time viewing the museum’s incredible Raptor Program, which features live birds of prey presented daily.

Original Wasco County Courthouse Museum In 1854, The Dalles was designated by the Territorial Legislature as the county seat of one of the largest counties ever formed in the United States. Wasco County extended from the crest of the Cascade Mountains to the Great Divide in the Rockies and encompassed 130,000 square miles. Construction began in 1858 under the supervision of Judge Orlando Humason, who was the first county judge and also the chairman of the Board of Commissioners. This small courthouse was used for public meeting places, church services, as well as the seat of law for the county. It is the oldest courthouse west of the Mississippi River.

The Dalles Area Chamber of Commerce Discover the history of this beautiful city. Learn about the many local attractions and buildings, and get a listing of the best places to grab a bite to eat, get a fine glass of wine, find a pharmacy, or do the most unique shopping. The friendly hosts will assist you in any way possible while informing you about their hometown.

Fort Dalles Museum Located in the former fort’s Surgeon’s Quarters built in 1856, the Fort Dalles Museum opened in 1905, making it one of Oregon’s oldest history museums. Take a tour of the unique collection of pioneer and military artifacts at one of the old west’s most pivotal places in history. Enjoy walking on the grounds of this military fort and viewing the historic collection of wagons and antique vehicles. The collection holds over 30 wheeled vehicles, including a stage coach, road-building equipment, a covered wagon, two horse-drawn hearses, the Umatilla House bus, and a surrey once owned by Oregon’s seventh governor, Zenas Ferry Moody. Explore the hand-hewn log buildings of the Anderson Homestead, including the pioneer house, granary, and barn.

National Neon Sign Museum Brand new in The Dalles, the National Neon Sign Museum is a walk through the evolution of light, from the earliest of light bulb signs (1880-1920) to the introduction of neon to the United States in 1923. The museum provides a dynamic and entertaining environment that promotes an understanding and appreciation of advertising and signage and the unique role it has played in American history. It provides historical, social, and cultural relevance through the exhibition of more than 20,000 square feet of electrifying signs, ephemera, and interactive displays that date from the late 1800s through the 1960s.

 

Day 7: Stevenson, Washington

Nestled between the Columbia River to the south, and the mountains and basalt cliffs of the Columbia River Gorge to the north, Stevenson offers a respite from the hustle and bustle of larger ports. The area has been home to Native American settlements for thousands of years. Their villages were focal points for commerce and social gatherings as they came to trade and fish along the riverbanks. Later, in 1843, the Oregon Trail brought the first of a great wave of settlers; pioneers portaged around the Cascade Rapids on their way to the Willamette Valley.

Included Shore Excursions
STEVENSON HOP-ON HOP-OFF TOUR

Columbia Gorge Interpretive Center This highly interactive museum is a favorite for many along the river. Enjoy a day of discovering the unique exhibits and artifacts that fill the museum. The mission of the Columbia Gorge Interpretive Center Museum is to share the story of Skamania County and the Columbia River Gorge. Make sure to visit “First People,” an exhibit focusing on the history of native people of this area – the Cascade Chinook. Then stop over at the “Grand Gallery” which is the largest gallery in the museum that showcases how to harvest resources and focuses on the timber industries throughout the gorge. One of the most popular exhibits is the large fish wheel located inside the premises and is a 37-foot replica of the McCord wheel built in 1882, equipped with baskets used to scoop fish as they swim through.

Bonneville Dam The Bonneville Dam is located 40 miles east of Portland, Oregon. It received its name from Captain Benjamin Bonneville – a soldier, trader, and explorer. It consists of a navigation lock (raises and lowers river traffic 60 feet), Powerhouse 1 (completed in 1938), a spillway (moves excess water and provides for downstream migration of young fish), fish ladders (for upstream migrating adult fish), and Powerhouse 2 (completed in 1983). Bonneville Dam can produce 1,227,000 kilowatts of electricity when needed, and moving over 10 million tons of cargo through its lock annually. Visitors can experience first-hand the operation of two hydroelectric powerhouses and watch migrating fish travel upstream at the underwater viewing rooms next to the fish ladders. These ladders are necessary so adult fish can continue their journey upstream to their spawning grounds past the dam. Depending on the season, Pacific Salmon, Pacific Lamprey, American Shad, and Sturgeon can be seen. Bonneville Lock and Dam has several recreation areas offering fishing, hiking, boating, and wildlife viewing access.

Downtown Stevenson Make a stop in Downtown Stevenson, where you can get a slice of what Stevenson is all about. Enjoy the many antique shops, historic buildings with vintage interiors, and beautiful, abundant gardens. Visit the boutiques and shops, restaurants, cafes, and convenience stores to treat yourself to a souvenir or a taste of the fine cuisine before heading to your next stop!

Premium Shore Excursions
MULTNOMAH FALLS AND VISTA HOUSE: INCLUDING THE OLD SCENIC HIGHWAY
 
As we travel the famous Old Scenic Highway, experience the astounding beauty of the Pacific Northwest. Feel the peaceful mist of Oregon’s tallest and most mighty waterfall, Multnomah Falls, as it crashes down on the rocky cliffs below. Watch in awe as this roaring 611-foot natural wonder demonstrates the power and beauty of nature in her rawest form. Continue along the “King of Roads” to capture a photo of?one of the most photographed views of the region, Crown Point – but the spectacular sights don’t stop there. At the Vista House, you’ll bask in the panoramic view of the breathtaking Columbia River more than 700 feet below and explore the unique octagonal structure.
 
 

Day 8: Stevenson, Washington

Nestled between the Columbia River to the south, and the mountains and basalt cliffs of the Columbia River Gorge to the north, Stevenson offers a respite from the hustle and bustle of larger ports. The area has been home to Native American settlements for thousands of years. Their villages were focal points for commerce and social gatherings as they came to trade and fish along the riverbanks. Later, in 1843, the Oregon Trail brought the first of a great wave of settlers; pioneers portaged around the Cascade Rapids on their way to the Willamette Valley.

Included Shore Excursions
STEVENSON HOP-ON HOP-OFF TOUR

Columbia Gorge Interpretive Center This highly interactive museum is a favorite for many along the river. Enjoy a day of discovering the unique exhibits and artifacts that fill the museum. The mission of the Columbia Gorge Interpretive Center Museum is to share the story of Skamania County and the Columbia River Gorge. Make sure to visit “First People,” an exhibit focusing on the history of native people of this area – the Cascade Chinook. Then stop over at the “Grand Gallery” which is the largest gallery in the museum that showcases how to harvest resources and focuses on the timber industries throughout the gorge. One of the most popular exhibits is the large fish wheel located inside the premises and is a 37-foot replica of the McCord wheel built in 1882, equipped with baskets used to scoop fish as they swim through.

Bonneville Dam The Bonneville Dam is located 40 miles east of Portland, Oregon. It received its name from Captain Benjamin Bonneville – a soldier, trader, and explorer. It consists of a navigation lock (raises and lowers river traffic 60 feet), Powerhouse 1 (completed in 1938), a spillway (moves excess water and provides for downstream migration of young fish), fish ladders (for upstream migrating adult fish), and Powerhouse 2 (completed in 1983). Bonneville Dam can produce 1,227,000 kilowatts of electricity when needed, and moving over 10 million tons of cargo through its lock annually. Visitors can experience first-hand the operation of two hydroelectric powerhouses and watch migrating fish travel upstream at the underwater viewing rooms next to the fish ladders. These ladders are necessary so adult fish can continue their journey upstream to their spawning grounds past the dam. Depending on the season, Pacific Salmon, Pacific Lamprey, American Shad, and Sturgeon can be seen. Bonneville Lock and Dam has several recreation areas offering fishing, hiking, boating, and wildlife viewing access.

Downtown Stevenson Make a stop in Downtown Stevenson, where you can get a slice of what Stevenson is all about. Enjoy the many antique shops, historic buildings with vintage interiors, and beautiful, abundant gardens. Visit the boutiques and shops, restaurants, cafes, and convenience stores to treat yourself to a souvenir or a taste of the fine cuisine before heading to your next stop!

Premium Shore Excursions
MULTNOMAH FALLS AND VISTA HOUSE: INCLUDING THE OLD SCENIC HIGHWAY
 
As we travel the famous Old Scenic Highway, experience the astounding beauty of the Pacific Northwest. Feel the peaceful mist of Oregon’s tallest and most mighty waterfall, Multnomah Falls, as it crashes down on the rocky cliffs below. Watch in awe as this roaring 611-foot natural wonder demonstrates the power and beauty of nature in her rawest form. Continue along the “King of Roads” to capture a photo of?one of the most photographed views of the region, Crown Point – but the spectacular sights don’t stop there. At the Vista House, you’ll bask in the panoramic view of the breathtaking Columbia River more than 700 feet below and explore the unique octagonal structure.
 
 

Day 9: Vancouver (Portland) Washington

As your American Queen Voyages journey concludes, there are other opportunities for you to take in the town — whether it’s an optional premier post-cruise experience or a quick transfer to the airport for your final trip home — your AQV team can pre-arrange everything for you

always all-inclusive

Return scheduled flights from London

2-night Pre-cruise Hotel Stay+

Premium City Highlights Tour (Embarkation Day)+

Transfers

Unlimited Included Guided Tours

Acclaimed Cuisine in Multiple Venues

In-room Dining Available

Unlimited WiFi

Bicycles* and Hiking Sticks

Live, Daily Onboard
Entertainment & Enrichment

Pre-Paid Gratuities

Open Bars & Lounges

Port Taxes & Fees

Unlimited Beverages

*River Cruises Only

+1-night on Minneapolis -New Orleans and Snake & Columbia itineraries/No City Highlights Tour

 

roundtrip Portland

  2024

10 Mar

24 Nov

01 Dec

sailing aboard

Terms and Conditions

Lead in fares shown are to be used as a guide only, based on the lowest cabin category for two people sharing. Pricing may be subject to change based on flight pricing & availability. Other cabin categories are available. Single cabin grades are available on selected vessels and cabins for sole occupancy are available at a single supplement. All itineraries can be tailor-made to your specification with cruise only, additional hotel nights, flight upgrades and UK regional airport departures (subject to availability).  Additional pre-voyage and post-voyage city stay packages (2 nights) may be purchased for an additional charge. Guests are required to present a credit card upon hotel check-in to cover their incidental charges. In lieu of an included pre-voyage hotel night on any voyage, a $50 per person onboard credit is available upon request and dependent upon voyage date. On a back-to-back voyage, two included hotel nights or a combination of one included hotel night plus a $50 per person onboard credit will be granted in lieu of taking a second included hotel night. All fares, itineraries, hotels, entertainment, shore excursions and other voyage attributes are subject to change, and we are not responsible for errors or omissions therein. American Queen Voyages is represented in the UK & Europe by Light Blue Travel (ABTA D6183 & V9324 ATOL 5489). Full Booking Conditions.

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